Alfred Trenkler Innocent Committee

Coming Events

  There have been:

     23 years, 5 months and 27 days since 29 November 1993 wrongful conviction of Alfred W. Trenkler.

     24 years, 1 month and 12 days  of wrongful incarceration, including the 231 days of pre-trial detention of 17-18 April 1992 (1) and from 16 December 1992 through 2 August 1993 (230). 

When will

      -The retrial be held?

      -Alfred Trenkler be released?

      -A complete, independent investigation of this case begin? (for an example

           of what such an inquiry looks like see the David Milgaard Inquiry in  

              Canada.)

1. UPCOMING EVENTS.

Whether by private investigators or by law enforcement officials or together, there will be some level of a re-investigation into the facts of this case.     

2. PAST EVENTS - in reverse chronological order.

11 October 2016Joan Baez concert in Boston highlights New England Innocence Project and Alfred Trenkler case. 

 

4 June 2008 The First Circuit Court of Appeals will be hearing the U.S. Attorney's appeal, and Alfred Trenkler's Cross-Appeal of Judge Zobel's April 2007 resentencing order. See the Court's 24 April 2008 ORDER.

4 April 2007. Second full meeting of the Alfred Trenkler Innocent Committee.

23 June 2006.  First meeting of the Alfred Trenkler Innocent Committee.

 

5 April 2006. Website created for Alfred Trenkler Innocent Committee, at

www.alfredtrenklerinnocent.org.

 

20-22 October 2005.  "Unlocking Innocence: Avoiding Wrongful Conviction"

  An international conference in Winnipeg, Canada about wrongful convictions.  Barry Scheck will be there.

"The conference brings together judges, defence lawyers, prosecutors, law enforcement personnel, legislators, journalists, the victims of wrongful convictions and others to examine the issues and search for remedies."

30 July, Saturday.   The recent Larry King Live show with Kirk Bloodsworth will be rebroadcast on Saturday, 30 July at 9 p.m.

  Kirk, who is now a program officer at The Justice Project, spent nine years in prison -- including two on death row -- for a murder he did not commit. Kirk's experience as an innocent man who was condemned to die underscores the critical need to address fundamental flaws in our broken criminal justice system to ensure that this type of injustice never happens again. Kirk is joined on the show by forensic pathology expert Dr. Cyril Wecht, attorney and author of the book on Kirk's story Tim Junkin, psychotherapist Dr. Robi Ludwig and former prosecutor Wendy Murphy.  
   If you are unable to watch Kirk on Larry King Live on Saturday, you may be able to see him on Court TV's Catherine Crier Live on Tuesday at 5 pm EST, or listen to his radio interviews on Relevant Radio (http://ga3.org/ct/L1_w5As1XmdR/relevantradio2 ) on Thursday, August 4 at 5 pm

17-20 July 2005.  National District Attorneys Association annual convention in Portland. (with local liaison being the Maine Prosecutors Assn.)

  For a look at what the NDAA thinks of the play/movie, "The Exonerated", see

the USA Today article, "Prosecutors take exception to Court TV film"

1 May, Sunday, 11:00 p.m. New Program on Court TV:  "Stories of the Innocence Project"

As pioneers in the field of wrongful convictions, the Innocence Project, created in 1992 by Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld, is a non-profit legal clinic in NYC that handles cases where post-conviction DNA testing of evidence can yield conclusive proof of innocence. Now, for the first time, Court TV opens up The Files of the Innocence Project. Having exonerated over 110 innocent people since its inception, the Innocence Project's tales are as inspiring as they are harrowing - full of persistence in the face of bad science and bad lawyering, and a firm commitment to knowledge as the only response to ignorance.

   The first show will feature the story of Stephen Cowans , who spent 6 years in prison due to misuse by the Boston police of a single fingerprint - which did not belong to Cowans' fingers.

28 April, Thursday, 10:00 p.m. (and encore on Sunday, May1 at 11:00 p.m.)  New Program on Court TV:  "Stories of the Innocence Project"

As pioneers in the field of wrongful convictions, the Innocence Project, created in 1992 by Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld, is a non-profit legal clinic in NYC that handles cases where post-conviction DNA testing of evidence can yield conclusive proof of innocence. Now, for the first time, Court TV opens up The Files of the Innocence Project. Having exonerated over 110 innocent people since its inception, the Innocence Project's tales are as inspiring as they are harrowing - full of persistence in the face of bad science and bad lawyering, and a firm commitment to knowledge as the only response to ignorance.

   The first show will feature the story of Stephen Cowans , who spent 6 years in prison due to misuse by the Boston police of a single fingerprint - which did not belong to Cowans' fingers.

1-3 April 2005.  2005 National Innocence Conference  in Washington, D.C.  Members of many States' Innocence Projects gather to learn and compare notes.   See the AGENDAFor more information, contact morrison bonpasse.

    One panel discussion will focus on working with the families of victims in whose names wrongful convictions were secured:

"Working with Victims and Families - This panel will address the complex and sensitive issues of how and whether lawyers or investigators working on a wrongful conviction case should contact a victim or the victim's loved ones and when and if to seek their support. The panelists will discuss strategies for working with the family of the wrongfully convicted person and including the families and the victim as advocates in the exoneration, i.e. how non-lawyers/students can be helpful in investigations and exonerations."

3-5 March 2005.  Annual Conference of Mass. Bar Association, in Boston to feature a wrongly convicted exoneree and co-founder of the Georgia Innocence Project.

Among the two featured speakers will be: Calvin C. Johnson, Jr., who spent 16 years behind bars in Georgia for a rape he did not commit, will deliver the keynote speech at the Annual Dinner on Friday, March 4. Johnson was freed from prison after the Innocence Project helped overturn his conviction using DNA forensics. His acclaimed autobiography, "Exit to Freedom," recounts his horrific experience and the reality of racism in the criminal justice system. Johnson is one of the founding members of the Georgia Innocence Project.

[A reader might ask what the Maine State Bar Association is doing about the risk of wrongful convictions.  So, far the answer seems to be nothing.]

29 and 30 January, Saturday(4 p.m) and Sunday (2pm).   COURT TV is showing the movie version of "The Exonerated". (a repeat of Thursday's showing)

    The original play was first presented in October 2002 (the same month as the publication of "Human Sacrifice", so it was a good month for the wrongfully convicted).   It's about 6 people who were sentenced to death, but who were later exonerated.  Starring in the film version are Brian Dennehy, Danny Glover, Delroy Lindo and Susan Sarandon.

    A review of the TV-movie version was in the NY Times on Sunday, by Anita Gates.  Other notices about it are in the New York Daily News and the Seattle Times, owned by the same company as the Portland Press Herald/Kennebec Journal.

24 January, Massachusetts Bar Assn. Annual meeting to focus on "Preventing Wrongful Convictions"

The plenary session of the Mass. Bar Assn. meeting will have an eight person panel to discuss "Preventing Wrongful Convictions".  The panelists will be: 

Justice Gordon L. Doefer, Mass. Appeals Court

  Justice Robert J. Cordy, Mass. Supreme Judicial Court

Justice Elspeth B. Cypher, Mass. Appeals Court.

   Larry J. Hammond, President American Judicature Society

   William M. Bennett, District Attorney, Hampden County

   Martha Coakley, District Attorney, Middlesex County

   J.W. Carney, Jr., Carney & Bassil, Boston

   Professor Saul Kassin, Williams College

Following this plenary session, there will be three breakout sessions: "Eyewitness Identification in Criminal Cases", "Jury Selection in Civil Trials" and "The Adversary system in 'Problem Solving Courts'".  Participating in those sessions will be:

  Justice Doerfer, Mass Appeals Court

  Justice James McHugh, Mass. Appeals Court

  Edward Flynn, Secretary of Public Safety for Massachusetts

  Judge Carol Ball, Mass. Superior Court

  Judge Raymond Brassard, Mass Superior Court

  Judge Richard Stearns, U.S. Federal District Court

  and many others.

  Following these sessions will be an address by the Chief Justice of the Mass. Supreme Court entitled, "Leading Through Law".